Patient Spotlight: Brandon

Brandon is a precious 19-month-old boy with an adjusted age of about 12 months. Born at 23.5 weeks gestation, Brandon was in the NICU for 6 months after birth and required intubation. Upon his release, Brandon required round-the-clock oxygen via Nasal Cannula. He had a VP shunt placed in June 2017 and a g-tube placed in July 2017. While in the NICU, Brandon underwent two swallow studies with results of NPO (no food or liquid by mouth) due to aspiration and penetration on thin liquids and penetration on thickened liquids. Besides taste trials, this was his diet upon release from the NICU in August 2017. In September 2017, Brandon began intensive feeding/vital stim therapy with THERAPY 2000. In October 2017, four weeks after starting treatment, another swallow study was conducted, and Brandon aspirated on all consistencies. He remained NPO with taste trials only outside of therapy but was cleared for trials of half nectar up to 15 mLs during therapy. Brandon’s parents and therapist were disappointed that he was not cleared for full PO feeds because he loved and thoroughly enjoyed eating. Nonetheless, Brandon continued intensive vital stim therapy twice weekly for another six months, with a follow-up swallow study in March 2018. Following the study, Brandon was cleared for full PO feeds at home, with restrictions to include nectar thickener for liquids. Due to the outstanding progress he made toward his goals, Brandon’s therapy frequency was reduced to once per week with the final goal to eliminate the need for using thickening agents. In September 2018 – less than a year after starting treatment with THERAPY 2000 – Brandon has fully transitioned back to the community and no longer requires therapy. He is thriving, gaining weight, loves food, and his family is excited that he can eat everything by […]


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Before they were SLP Interns, they were superheroes in Uganda

In Spring 2018, Louise Havron and Marissa Fretz had the unique opportunity to spend their final graduate school externship working with Hope Speaks, a nonprofit organization developed to provide speech therapy, advocacy, and education to children and adults across Kampala, Uganda. While in Uganda, Louise and Marissa worked with children and families who have faced and overcome a variety of challenges. Some lived in 10×10 rooms in a slum, walking several miles each day to then sit in a waiting room until their child to be treated. Others have had to remove their kids from school because transportation became unavailable or tuition could no longer be paid. Through speech therapy, they empowered families to help their loved ones and saw both children and adults who had a lot to say once given the means and guidance to express themselves. Both Louise and Marissa were overwhelmed by the selflessness of the community and the motivation of their patients’ families to find help. They observed that when an individual learned something new, it spread through the community and resulted in greater education, awareness, and acceptance. Louise and Marissa both said that seeing communities work together and take care of each other – striving to help each child reach their full potential and participate more fully in life – was indescribable. They felt extremely blessed to have the opportunity to raise awareness about how speech therapy can increase the quality of life. Both feel that working with and growing with the families in and around Kampala was a life-changing experience. As time goes on, Louise and Marissa pray for increased education greater accessibility to therapy services for communities across Uganda. The experience, they said, both changed and molded their perspectives on life and resilience. They learned that while we don’t get to choose […]


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Save the Date for the North Texas Day of Giving

With constant changes to health care coverage in the United States, families with disabled children often struggle to meet those children’s needs. From transportation to doctor’s appointments and providing care to disabled children to securing the equipment these children may require, many of these families must choose between   meeting other children’s needs and providing for their disabled youth. Luckily, there are fundraising opportunities – that you and your organization can contribute to – that help these children and their families. Chari-T2000 is a charity organization operated by T2000 Healthcare, creating assistance opportunities for families with disabled children up to age 21. The funds raised by the North Texas Day of Giving will go toward the many missions of Chari-T2000, including but not limited to: Providing home modifications for disabled children Securing hearing and communication devices, weighted or sensory support items, assistive devices and more Providing transportation for children and families for appointments and other outings Securing durable equipment for children’s medical needs If you or your organizations would like to be part of this incredible fundraiser, set up a FUNdraising page for your favorite organization or contact the North Texas Giving Day organizers for more information.  


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Employee Spotlight: Megan Clark, MS, CCC-SLP – DFW Division

Megan Clark is a mother of six and a Speech Language Pathologist in our DFW division. Her plan was always to work with special-needs children, and she originally considered pursuing a degree in Special Education. During college, Megan discovered a passion for Speech Pathology and soon felt certain that she wanted to become a Speech Therapist. Megan married her high school sweetheart, Ray, and after finishing graduate school in 2005, she worked full-time for a school district and PRN for THERAPY 2000. The couple always believed adoption would be part of their story, and this was further confirmed when Megan began treating two children who lived in a group foster home. Megan recalls some of the children asking if she could be their mom, and she was heartbroken by the thought of a child facing each day without knowing the love of a mother and father. Several years went by, and the Clarks had three biological kids and were licensed for foster care. Over a six-year period, they welcomed nine children into their home as long-term foster placements. Their fifth placement was their youngest ever at just two days old. Her name is Rosalie, and the Clarks adopted her 15 months later. In April 2016, they saw a photo of a four-year-old boy with phenylketonuria (PKU), a genetic metabolic condition present at birth. PKU requires lifelong management of diet and a special medical formula to avoid permanent brand damage. They began the process to adopt him shortly thereafter, and met their son, Rex, in March 2017. Just before traveling to Beijing for Rex, the Clarks’ adoption agency listed Minnie, a little girl with Down Syndrome. They decided to pursue her adoption shortly after returning from China with Rex. The Clarks loved Minnie from the moment they saw their first video […]


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Patient Success Story – Meet Simon

We are proud of what we do. Every day, our patients reach new milestones, improving their independence, and ultimately, their lives. Going forward, we’ll share patient success stories, employee achievements, and the latest agency/industry news here in the Home Health Heartbeat as well as our various social media pages. Be sure to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! We’re committed to helping you keep your finger on the pulse (get it?) of all that’s going on. THERAPY 2000 is a proven leader in achieving maximum outcomes through quality, innovative, clinically-excellent therapy. We’re delighted to share this story, which is just one example of how our patients receive the best care from the best therapists in the industry. Simon is an eight-year-old boy whose parents were told he would never walk… Born with Lowe Syndrome, a rare genetic condition that affects the eyes, brain, and kidneys, and occurs in one out of 500,000 people – almost exclusively in males – Simon has had a total of 24 surgeries to date. Children with Lowe Syndrome are often born with weak muscle tone from birth (neonatal hypotonia), which contributes to feeding challenges, difficulty breathing, and delayed development of motor skills such as sitting, standing and walking. Initially, Simon needed a g- button for nutrition. However, he is now able to eat specially prepared food. Simon receives Physical Therapy from Ann Tally, PT. His treatment has focused on helping him to become as independent as possible. The onset of seizures at age six, as well as multiple setbacks and hospitalizations, have not deterred Simon, and his family have provided continuous encouragement as he has reached motor milestones. About a year ago, Simon started walking without assistive devices. He recently went on vacation with his family and was able to enjoy the beach, the zoo, and boardwalk without […]


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