Darla Grant

Meet Darla Grant – Today’s Role Model for Women in Healthcare

THERAPY 2000 is thrilled to announce that Darla Grant, PT, MPT, has been named Chief Operating Officer. Grant joined the company in 2010 as a part-time Physical Therapist and has been a mentor and servant leader to our employees throughout her tenure. A Modern Role Model A 24-year healthcare and therapy veteran, Grant has worked with clients of all types. She uses her education and expertise to create the kind of experience in which employees thrive. Grant, a single mother of two grown children, Shelby and Hunter, is an example that women truly can have it all – family, career, and personal satisfaction in what they do. Getting to the Top Like most successful leaders, Grant worked her way through the organization, learning and impressing her managers in each role she was given. Soon after joining THERAPY 2000 as a part-time therapist, she was promoted to district supervisor. In 2012, she was promoted to East Texas Division Director, and in 2017, she was named Senior Director, Operations. In this role, Darla was responsible for patient care statewide. In her role as COO, Grant is responsible for aligning the back-office and clinical sides of the organization. In addition to leading the service delivery aspect of the organization, she now oversees the patient intake and insurance authorizations processes, marketing, and recruiting. Local Roots, Global Branches Grant enjoys traveling and has taking cruises. She has spent time in parts of Europe, the Caribbean, and Mexico. Traveling has given her the ability to embrace and appreciate various cultures and traditions, which gives her an appreciation for the uniqueness of her clients and staff. However, she is also a deep-rooted Texan who loves watching Texas A&M football. Grant received her Bachelors from Texas A&M University and her Master’s from the University of Texas-Medical Branch.


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Language Success Story- Carolina

Carolina is a joyful (and now) very talkative 5-year-old with a diagnosis of Phonological Disorder. Phonological disorder is a type of speech sound disorder, which means a child or adult has difficulty saying sounds clearly making them difficult to understand. Carolina began therapy with Early Childhood Intervention (ECI) but continued to exhibit difficulty with her speech after turning 3. She was brought on with Green Apple Therapy in September of 2017 at the age of 4. During the evaluation, Carolina was difficult to understand and was easily frustrated when she was asked to repeat herself.   In addition, she could not effectively communicate with her family and friends.  Her mother was concerned and expressed that Carolinas frustration that was only getting worse in the home. She struggled with telling her parents, brothers, and grandparents a story of what happened during the day.   During the evaluation, her speech therapist, Lora, and the student clinician could understand less than 50% of what Carolina said.  Lora diagnosed 6 active phonological processes, which are the patterns of sound errors that typically developing children use to simplify speech as they are learning to talk. Verbal and Visual Treatment Treatment for Carolina relied heavily on verbal and visual modeling from her therapist. They began working on speech sounds that she should have been producing correctly at her age.  Lora had Carolina with practicing the sound by itself, then putting the sound into words, and lastly using the words into a sentence. A significant factor in her success has been her family’s involvement. Her mom has been an active participant in all sessions and demonstrated her ability to model target sounds and carryover therapy techniques into the home. Conversation Queen Carolina is now 85% or more intelligible in conversation and loves to talk to everyone.  At the beginning of each session, she likes to tell […]


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Speech Therapy Success Story- Jane

Jane is an 11-year-old girl who enjoys playing with Beanie Babies and Barbie dolls. Her parents referred Jane for speech therapy due to concerns about her difficulties with speaking clearly and completing given tasks such as daily chores without repeated reminders. Jane’s overall speech intelligibility was notably compromised and was comprehensive to listeners about 50% of the time, especially if the subject of the conversation was unfamiliar to her. She required verbal reminders 100% of the time, even when a single task was given. Initial Speech Therapy Evaluation During the initial speech and language evaluation, the evaluating therapist, Makiko Ogawa, learned that Jane was receiving speech therapy services in a special education classroom at school due to having been diagnosed with intellectual disability. After standardized tests for articulation and language were administered, Makiko gathered additional data and information from Jane and her parents to develop the most appropriate treatment plan. Considering the evaluation results and Jane’s unique learning styles, therapy goals were set in order to maximize Jane’s cognitive-communicative functions, instead of working on specific articulation or language skills. “Things I Can Do Better” Once therapy began, Jane and Makiko discussed what makes a person’s speech intelligible or unintelligible, and they demonstrated intelligible vs. non-intelligible speech. Based on the discussion and reverse demonstrations of the patient’s speaking demeanor by her SLP, Jane chose three elements: the rate of speech, the volume of speech,  and eye contact as “the things I can do better.” Those three elements were practiced repeatedly via a variety of therapy tasks and multi-modal assistance, like using a mirror and creating recordings. As for Jane’s difficulty of completing the given multiple tasks, the visual task board of “First…then…” was introduced. This is a type of low-tech, assistive communication device to indicate with picture icons what needs to be done […]


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Employee Spotlight- Michelle

Meet Michelle Tebout, a Therapy 2000 Speech-Language Pathologist in our DFW division. She was born and raised in Northwest Indiana (near Chicago/Lake Michigan) and recently moved to Fort Worth to enjoy the warmer weather. Education Michelle received her Bachelor’s degree from Indiana University-Bloomington and a Master’s from Indiana State University. Michelle was introduced to speech therapy by a sorority sister who encouraged her to take a speech/audiology class and was immediately hooked. The more Michelle learned, the more she fell in love with the field.  She loves working in pediatric home health because the setting allows her to work alongside caregivers in the child’s environment, and it requires quick thinking Hobbies in Fort Worth and Around the World Michelle comes from a big family. She has three older brothers and four nieces/nephews. They very close-knit, and she has already welcomed a few visitors since moving here three months ago! She is having fun getting to know Fort Worth and eating at various restaurants. Some of Michelle’s hobbies include traveling the world, cycling, hiking and spending time with her 8-month-old puppy, Mowgli. Michelle has traveled several places over the years, and her favorite so far was Bangkok, Thailand.  Her next travel destination is Barcelona, Spain Pediatric Background In Indiana, Michelle worked in a pediatric clinic where she served both ECI and private-pay patients. She has also for an acute-care hospital. Since graduating, Michelle’s passion has been working with the pediatric population. She enjoys early language development as well as helping patients with ASD and motor-planning difficulties. Michelle is excited to expand her knowledge on feeding interventions in the next year. She is looking forward to meeting and working with other therapists throughout the organization.


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Physical Therapy Patient Spotlight — Olivia

Olivia is an adorable 17-month-old girl who was born 6.5 weeks early with a diagnosis of Trisomy 2 (duplication of part of chromosome #2). Olivia spent her first few months in the NICU and had a tracheostomy placed at 7 months of age. Due to Olivia’s rare diagnosis, she has low muscle tone, which contributes to feeding difficulties, problems with breathing, and delayed development of motor skills such as sitting, standing, and walking. Olivia’s physical therapy treatment over the past 2-3 months has focused on helping her to become independent and focuses on mobility. Olivia’s most recent accomplishments are transitioning into sitting all on her own and commando crawling! Go Baby Go! Oliva’s therapist, Heather Pitner, PT, and a group of THERAPY 2000 therapists attended a workshop to learn how to modify toy power vehicles through GoBabyGo!  This program started several years ago at the University of Delaware by Cole Galloway, PhD, PT. After studying infant behavior, Dr. Galloway became interested in closing what he calls “the exploration gap.”  This is the gap that we see between children with typical mobility and those who experience mobility impairments such as cerebral palsy, spina bifida, and Down syndrome. When an infant or toddler reaches for an object, scoots across the carpet, or learns to walk around the room, she’s learning to interact with her environment in a way that forges new connections. A mobile child learns how to explore a room and approach other children. Go Baby Go! provides powered toy cars to developmentally disabled children from 8 months to 4 years old. This enables these children to move themselves similarly to typically developing children. Research has shown that early mobility opportunities lead to an increase in social interaction and cognitive development.   New Surroundings The moment Olivia was placed in her new […]


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