Assistive technology (AT) is an item or piece of equipment that can help a patient with tasks that they are unable to perform on their own. Assistive technology can aid patients with activities of daily living, improve quality of life and self-image, and increase social interaction and independence. The Assistive Technology Program at THERAPY 2000 focuses on ensuring that patients have appropriate seating, mobility, and communication systems as well as providing the patient with tools to access these systems. Our therapists help patients more effectively use the assistive technology equipment that they currently have or help them obtain new equipment to help them meet their needs.

Assistive Technology

Seating and Mobility

Patients with cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, brain injury, spinal cord injury, spina bifida or other conditions that affect the ability to sit comfortably or walk may benefit from a seating or mobility system. Examples of seating and mobility systems include wheelchairs, walkers, and cushions.

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC)

A communication system could be as simple as using a communication book containing symbols to a more complex computer-based system. Patients with autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, apraxia, dysarthria, brain injury, or any other condition that causes them to be non-verbal, low verbal, or have unintelligible speech may benefit from a communication system.

Access

Some patients may need another piece of equipment to help them use their mobility system or their communication system. Examples of equipment that these patients may need include a switch, joystick, or special headrest sensors to access their wheelchair. A switch, head-controlled mouse, or even an eye-controlled camera may be necessary to provide access to a communication system.

Services

For patients without equipment, our therapists have the training and expertise to evaluate the the patient’s skills and areas of need. The therapist will determine if the patient could benefit from assistive technology and if so, which piece of equipment is appropriate. The therapist will also obtain input from family and caregivers during the evaluation. The therapist will look at funding sources available for each patient and work with the funding source to obtain the equipment. Once equipment is received, the therapist will incorporate the equipment into the therapy session. Training in the use and maintenance of the equipment is provided to parents and caregivers. If a patient already has appropriate equipment but has not reached their full potential, this will be targeted in therapy. The therapist will provide the patient with teaching and support to enable them to use the equipment to the best of their abilities.

THERAPY 2000’s Hearing Program has three sub-programs to help children of Texas with their audiological needs. THERAPY 2000 offers a Hearing Screening Program, Aural Rehabilitation Program and Auditory Processing Disorder (APD) Program.